Get to know the WE-Africans

WE-Africa is an alliance of likeminded scholars and practitioners, the We-Africans, who share a common concern about the current socio-economic and environmental conditions of societies across Africa. The We-Africans conduct cutting-edge research, promote new practices, operate within government departments and engage in public debate with a view to promoting a transition to a wellbeing-based economy  for our continent. The WE-Africans reject the popular notion of Africa Rising! and intend to use transdisciplinary evidence to promote a vision of development in which human beings do not exploit their ecosystems, but rather work collaboratively to promote human and natural wellbeing. This is what we mean by Africans Thriving! We need a new concept of development and success to build a better economy and a more prosperous society.

“Poor, resource-dependent communities disproportionately bear the cost of this land grab, being driven by diverse and growing global market demands – not least for food, biofuels, other non-food agricultural commodities, timber, minerals, and carbon-offsetting opportunities.”

Ward Anseeuw

Ward Anseeuw
Dr Ward Anseeuw, a development economist and policy analyst, is a research fellow at the Agricultural Research Centre for International Development (CIRAD) seconded to the Post-Graduate School of Agriculture and Rural Development of the University of Pretoria. He is also the co-director of the Center for the Study of Governance Innovations. He has conducted research for the last 15 years in Southern Africa and the African continent, more particularly on the issues of agricultural and land policies, agrarian and land reforms, land conflicts and large-scale land acquisitions. He has published extensively on these issues in scientific journals and with renowned publishers, including Land, transition and compromise (with Chris Alden, Palgrave, 2009), The struggle over land in Africa – Conflicts, politics and change (with Chris Alden, HSRC Press, 2010) and South Africa’s Agrarian Reform (In French, Editions Universitaires Européennes, 2011).

Land and agrarian reform, inclusive businesses and growth, structural transformation, inclusive development

“Risk more than others think is safe. Care more than others think is wise. Dream more than others think is practical. Expect more than others think is possible”

Sidney Luckett

Sidney Luckett

I have spent almost my entire adult life as a social justice activist and an academic.
I was born in Bloemfontein and did and obtained a BSc Hons (Mathematics) degree at Stellenbosch (1968). While I was at Stellenbosch I was greatly influenced by the Dialectical Tradition of Andre Degenaar and Rick Turner (who was later assassinated by the South African security police) as well as the writings of Bertrand Russell, who not only answered many of my questions about mathematics but also about injustice and religious intolerance.
From there I went to Oxford University on a Rhodes Scholarship where I completed an MPhil (Economics) specialising in Development Economics. I had hoped to learn more about economic inequality and exploitation, but Oxford was not the place to teach me that. I returned to South Africa work to work in the squatter camps and rural slums as a priest in the Anglican Church.
This inevitably got me involved in the anti-Apartheid resistance movement. The most significant of these activities was the formation of the United Democratic Front (UDF), of which I was an executive member until being imprisoned in solitary confinement in 1985. After my release from detention the UDF was banned and I was recruited into the ANC’s Mkhonto weSizwe.

Following the unbanning of the liberation organisations in 1990, I moved to the University of Natal to take up a lectureship in the School of Rural Community Development, and at the university eventually became the Research Director of the Centre for Environment, Agriculture and Development specializing in organizational systems for rural development. While there I obtained a PhD in ‘Critical Systems Thinking’.
From 2005 – 2011 I was adviser to the Western Cape government on environmental economics and institutional innovation. On the completion of that contract I spent a six-month sabbatical at Harvard Kennedy School.
On my return I became involved in various projects and organisations committed to deepening democratic processes, environmental justice and human rights issues. These included involvement in building a social justice NPO, research into national well-being measures, a learning process approach to small-scale agro-ecosystem farming, research into economic planning in African countries, involvement in a Kurdish human rights organisation and, my most recent passion, documentary photography that focuses on the dignity of people living in the margins of ‘development’.

Critical Systems Thinking, Natural/human systems interaction, Agro-ecosystems, Measures of national well-being, Leadership development, Documentary Photography, Facilitation of multi-stakeholder projects

Samuel Oloruntoba

Samuel Oloruntoba

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Samuel Oloruntoba is a Senior Lecturer at the Thabo Mbeki African Leadership Institute, University of South Africa. He obtained his PhD in Political Science from the University of Lagos, Nigeria, where he taught from 2007 to 2014. He has published in Journals and contributed to book chapters widely. He has won different Fellowship awards in Africa and United States of America. He was Visiting Scholar to Brown University and Northwestern University in United States of America in 2009 and 2010, respectively. Samuel Oloruntoba’s research focuses on the Political Economy of Development with Africa as his core area of study.

Social wellbeing, inequality, global economic justice, citizenship action, sustainable development

Sally Matthews

Sally Matthews

Sally Matthews

I teach politics at Rhodes University, where my focus is on comparative politics and African Studies. I have an abiding interest in issues related to development, inequality, poverty and privilege. I also have an interest in thinking through how we can best teach about these issues and, particularly, how we can best teach about Africa in Africa. I write on a broad range of topics, but all relate in some way to concerns about how to appropriately and effectively respond to the inequalities both within South Africa and globally.

Post-development theory, non-governmental organisations, privilege, race and transformation in South Africa

“Looking at the future of the food-energy-water nexus”

Saliem Fakir

Saliem Fakir

Saliem Fakir is the Head of the Policy and Futures Unit at the WWF South Africa. The Unit’s work is focused on identifying ways to manage a transition to a low-carbon economy as well as looking at the future of the food-energy-water nexus.Saliem Fakir was previously (2007-2008) a senior lecturer at the Department of Public Administration and Planning and associate Director for the Center for Renewable and Sustainable Energy at the University of Stellenbosch.Saliem Fakir previously worked for Lereko Energy (Pty) Ltd (2006) an investment company focusing on project development and financial arrangements for renewable energy, biofuels, waste and water sectors. He also served as Director of the World Conservation Union South Africa (IUCN-SA) office for 8 years (1998-2005).
Saliem served on a number of Boards. He is currently the chair of the Board of GreenCape a special purpose vehicle of the government of the Western Cape. He currently serves of the advisory board of Inspired Evolution One – a private equity fund for clean technology.He is also a columnist for various newspapers and publications.

Energy economics/technologies, Finance, Development economics, Sustainability issues

“Love, peace and wisdom are the three golden keys”

Rehana Moosajee

Rehana Moosajee

Rehana Moosajee is passionate about people, places, planet and potential. She holds a BA Education from Wits. She is the founder and owner of Rehana Moosajee Consulting.

Rehana’s style is characterized by bringing the richness of her life experiences to bear on the work she does. These include: the Gross National Happiness in
Business Summit in Bhutan, Interfaith / Intercultural tour to Turkey, Call of the Time Dialogues in Port Edward, SA and Peace of Mind Retreat in Rajasthan, India amongst others.

Rehana was a Councillor in the City of Johannesburg. Under her stewardship, Johannesburg introduced Africa’s first Bus Rapid Transit System – Rea Vaya.

Local Government; Facilitation; Inspirational Speaking; Urban Mobility

Local Government; Facilitation; Inspirational Speaking; Urban Mobility


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Knowledge liberates society

Prince Mashele

Prince Mashele

Prince Mashele is a Senior Research Fellow at GovInn. He lectured in the Department of Political Sciences at the University of Pretoria. Mashele was also a political analyst for Nedbank Capital, until March 2015. He had a stint as a speechwriter in The Presidency under former President Thabo Mbeki. Mashele is a prolific writer and commentator on diverse subjects related to his training as a political scientist. He is the author of The Death of our Society and co-author of the Fall of the ANC: What Next? The latter book is a best seller in South Africa.

South African political economy, Dynamics of social change, Political philosophy

 

“At the heart of our ethical woes is an extraordinary talent grounded in our narcissistic need to think of ourselves as good people, namely, the unremitting creative struggle to keep reality out of mind”

Pedro Tabensky

Pedro Tabensky
I am the founding director of the Allan Gray Centre for Leadership Ethics (AGCLE) based at the Department of Philosophy, Rhodes University.
I study visual arts in order to express my confusions and insecurities and I studied philosophy in order to make sense of them. I can’t say that I succeeded, but perhaps I put these very personal problems to creative use, developing, with my colleagues at the AGCLE, a weird and wonderful programme entitled Existential Conversations. The basic idea guiding the programme goes back to Plato, who thought that ethical wisdom and knowledge were part of the same phenomenon, the cultivation of the ability to see the light. In this regard the process of working to become more ethical is nothing more than the process of overcoming alienation, a view that Plato shares with Franz Fanon.

Ethics, social psychology, psychoanalysis, philosophical psychology, postcolonial theory

“The production of knowledge by activists in their confrontations with power – a praxis-centric epistemology – is the most important advantage we possess, in the intensifying global and local struggle over ideas”

Patrick Bond

Patrick Bond

Patrick Bond combines political economy and political ecology in his research and applied work. He is senior professor at the University of KwaZulu-Natal School of Built Environment and Development Studies where since 2004 he has directed the Centre for Civil Society. His studies presently address economic crisis from global to household scales; environment especially energy, water and climate change; social mobilization and public policy advocacy; and geopolitics (especially rising powers), and he publishes about contemporary problems in South Africa, Zimbabwe, the African continent, the BRICS bloc and global-scale processes.

Economic crisis from global to household scales; environment especially energy, water and climate change;
social mobilization and public policy advocacy; geopolitics

Noble Wadzah

Noble Wadzah

Noble Wadzah
Currently, Noble Wadzah coordinates Oilwatch Ghana, serves on the steering committees of Oilwatch Africa and Oilwatch international.
On Friends of the Earth Africa’s Platform, he was an active crusader against the rights buses associated with International Financial Institutions funded projects, such as the West Africa gas pipeline.
My engagements with multiple actors – Government(s) , Development Agencies and Civil Society- is focused on changing the current development paradigm, driven by profit accumulation, and the warped standards for calculating growth-GDP. Realities from my community interactions within and beyond Africa strengthens my inner stage, on the relevance of a people centered development, alternative to what prevails.

Environmental/Ecological rights, Energy Poverty and Renewable, Organic Agriculture and climate change, GMOs, land Grand and Marginalization, Conflicts and Extractive

Nnimmo Bassey

Nnimmo Bassey

Nnimmo Bassey

Nnimmo Bassey is director of an ecological think-tank, Health of Mother Earth Foundation (HOMEF) and Coordinator of Oilwatch International. Bassey has authored books on the environment, architecture and poetry. His poetry collections include We Thought It Was Oil But It Was Blood (2002) and I will Not Dance to Your Beat (Kraft Books, 2011). His book, To Cook a Continent – Destructive Extraction and the Climate Crisis in Africa (Pambazuka Press, 2012) has been translated in Portuguese and Finnish (2014).

Environmental Justice, Climate Change, Oil Politics, Hunger Politics

Nelson Alusala

Nelson Alusala

Nelson Alusala

Dr Nelson Alusala is a Research Fellow at the Institute for Security Studies in South Africa.
His research interests revolve around Africa’s leadership. He holds that higher GDP should translate into net national economic dividends for the (poor) masses who are trapped in the labyrinth of endless poverty, disease and illiteracy.
How can the GDP of a country of only handful billionaires and millions of beggars be regarded as a true reflection of the country’s economic wellbeing?
He continues to undertake policy-impacting research on the interplay
among factors influencing war economies, informal economies and governance in Africa. He has published widely on disarmament, demobilisation and economic reintegration (DDR) of former combatants in security sector reform (SSR) contexts. He has worked for the UN sanctions committees as an expert on the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) as well as on Liberia.

 

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Nceku Nyathi

Nceku Nyathi
Nceku Nyathi is a senior lecturer at the Allan Gray Centre for Values- Based Leadership at the GSB. With a pedigree in organizational studies and leadership theory, he has 
a deep interest in the role
 of values in transforming business on the continent. He is a founding member of the Africa Academy of Management (AFAM) and co-chair for the Africa academy of Management conference in Nairobi, Kenya in January 2016 with the conference theme, Managing Africa’s Future, Prospects and Challenges. AFAM mission is to promote and advance knowledge creation and dissemination about management in and about Africa. Nceku is also on the editorial board of the Africa journal of Management. Nceku has also been part of the team researching Africapitalism in Africa with exploring how the private sector, public sector and government could create collaborative partnerships that could create social wealth, innovation and development for Africa

Critical approaches to leadership, effectiveness of executive education in Africa, values-based leadership

Najma Mohammed

Najma Mohammed

Najma Mohammed

Najma Mohamed is an environmental scientist and writer with an academic background in both the natural and social sciences and over 15 years multi-sectoral experience in mainstreaming sustainable development principles in governance, planning, policy, education and financing processes. Throughout her career, she has been actively involved in developing and profiling transformative and inclusive approaches to sustainable development, from community- to the regional-level and in various economic sectors. She enjoys working at the interface of research, development policy and practice, and is committed to championing solutions which are unequivocally committed towards addressing the environmental and social dimensions of sustainable development.

 

She is currently based at the International Labour Organization as National Coordinator of the inter-agency UN initiative, Partnership for Action on Green Economy (PAGE) in South Africa. She has also been active in the print and broadcast media, in building awareness and communicating on environment, development and climate issues.

Sustainability Transition Pathways, Human-Environment Relations, Science-Policy Interface, Environmental Ethics, Education and Training, Political Ecology, Ecology and Biodiversity, Communication and Knowledge Management.

“Measuring what matters”

Michael Weatherhead

Michael Weatherhead

Michael came to South Africa in 2012 to take NEF’s ideas and frameworks to a new audience in the Global South.

As an economist, Michael is an accredited SROI practitioner and trainer in progressive approaches to measuring value for money.

As an organisational development practitioner, he has both developed and delivered tools (Happiness at Work survey) and processes (Well-Supplied) to bring wellbeing into the heart of business conversations and decision-making.

Michael has brought an understanding and use of wellbeing in decision making into organisations as diverse as the UK National Health Service (NHS), in2food and Timberland.

Based in Cape Town, he boosts his own wellbeing through regular kite surfing.

 

“If you want to build a ship, don’t drum up people to collect wood and don’t assign them tasks and work, but rather teach them to long for the endless immensity of the sea” Antoine de Saint-Exupery

Megan Seneque

Megan Seneque

Megan’s career both as an academic and as a social process and development professional began in South Africa at the University of Kwa-Zulu Natal. She was involved in long-term work on curriculum transformation in the transition to post-Apartheid South Africa. Megan was Founding Director of the University of Kwa-Zulu Natal’s Leadership Centre – established to build new and appropriate forms of leadership for sustainable development in the African context.

She is currently involved in a number of global projects, working with participatory processes that enable collaboration across traditional boundaries and which promote systemic change. These projects integrate research, process consulting and human development.

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Mary-Jane Morifi

Mary-Jane Morifi

Mary-Jane Morifi

Mary-Jane Morifi is an independent Social Development consultant currently supporting The Nelson Mandela Children’s Hospital Capital Campaign to raise the R1 billion ($100million) required to build the Mandela Legacy Children’s Hospital in Johannesburg. She is the former Executive Head of Corporate Affairs for Anglo American Platinum where she initiated and launched the R3.5 billion ($350 million) Mine Community Empowerment Project – Project Alchemy which resulted in the formation of Lefa La Rona Trust. Mary Jane joined Anglo American Platinum from BP International in the UK. She is a Harvard Fellow and is active in a number of not for profit community development organizations. She is a part time faculty member of the University of Cambridge Institute for Sustainability Leadership.

“To be truly radical means co-producing with societal actors real-world solutions that can be implemented now rather than reproducing analyses that with ever-great elegance clarify what is wrong and why others act so consistently to prevent change from taking place.”

Mark Swilling

Mark Swilling
Professor Mark Swilling is Programme Coordinator of the Sustainable Development Programme in the School of Public Leadership, Faculty of Economic and Management Science, Stellenbosch University. He is also Co-Director of a new initiative to establish at Stellenbosch University the Stellenbosch Centre for Complex Systems in Transition (CST) that will be up and running from January 2016. He is co-founder of the Sustainability Institute and Academic Director until 2015. He has been a member of UNEP’s International Resource Panel since 2007, Coordinating this Panel’s Cities Working Group. His research is on global transition, sustainable urbanization, African cities and governance for sustainable futures

Sustainable development, African cities, Sustainable urbanization, Green economy, Urban infrastructure planning and governance, South Africa’s green economy

Marian Goodman

Marian Goodman

Marian Goodman

Marian Goodman directs global Programmes and Capacity building for the Presencing Institute, working closely with Dr Otto Scharmer of MIT in designing and delivering social innovation labs and training around the world.
She leads Presencing / Theory U Programmes in Africa, South America, Europe & UK, Asia/China and USA; and manages various international cross-sectoral labs including a ‘Global Wellbeing Lab: Transforming Society & the Economy’ (in collaboration with GIZ’s Global Leadership Academy and Bhutan’s GNH Centre), and a Brazil-based Innovation Lab on Consumption.
In addition to WE-Africa, she collaborates with the start-up African Finance Innovation Lab.
Marian lives in Cape Town.

Wellbeing for all; social innovation; Theory U; leadership for profound innovation & change

Mao Amis

Mao Amis

“Energy economics, low carbon transition and green economy for South Africa”

Manisha Gulati

Manisha Gulati

Manisha is an Energy Economist with WWF South Africa. She has over 14 years of multi-disciplinary experience drawing on development, resource, energy and environmental economics covering India and South Africa. Her core areas of work are energy, low carbon development, green economy, resources nexus, and sustainability transitions. She specializes in quantitative and qualitative analysis, and policy formulation and analysis.

At WWF South Africa, Manisha leads the work on energy economics, low carbon transition and green economy for South Africa. She co-manages the food-energy-water nexus programme. This programme aims to develop an understanding of the complex relationship between water, energy and food systems from the perspective of a sustainable and secure economic and social future for South Africa.

Manisha started her career at The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI), India’s leading energy and environment focussed research organization and has since worked in the consulting and financing sectors. She is an economics graduate from St. Stephen’s College, India and holds a Masters Degree in Business Economics from the University of Delhi, India. She has several publications to her credit.

Energy, Low carbon development, Green economy, Resources nexus, Development economics

“It is better to aim for the stars and hit the top of the tree, than to aim for the top of the tree and hit its trunk”

Lowell Skarr

Lowell Skarr

I am currently completing my PhD in Economics at Rhodes University. The focus of my study is rural development, specifically looking at ways to improve the success of interventions for sustainable livelihood creation. I am a Fellow of the Allan Gray Orbis Foundation, and aspiring entrepreneur in the food and sustainability sectors. I see the world, and Africa in particular, at a juncture – we can either continue down our current path towards greater inequality and environmental catastrophe, or we can change. I’m optimistic that we will set ourselves on a new path to development, one that sees human and environmental well being as integrally linked, with growth not the only way of making lives better.

Economics, Agriculture, Sustainability, Innovation, Environment.

Louise van Rhyn

Louise van Rhyn

Louise van Rhyn
Louise van Rhyn is a social entrepreneur. Her approach to change is shaped by 20 years of working as an Organisational Change practitioner. She holds a Doctorate in Complex Social Change and has founded a few entrepreneurial organisations. In 2010 she started the School at the Centre of Community social change process and the Partners for Possibility leadership development and principal support process: an innovative process to change education in South Africa through collaborative partnerships between business leaders and school principals

 

We create wealth every day when we restore our ecosystems, invest in our communities, educate our children and spend time together strengthening social bonds. When we grow or cook our own food, produce our own energy and share our knowledge and expertise free of charge, we build the pillars of our economies. Poverty is not about limited cash, but it is about unfulfilled capabilities and isolation from other fellow humans and the natural systems that make our lives worthwhile.”

Lorenzo Fioramonti

Lorenzo Fioramonti

Lorenzo Fioramonti is professor of political economy at the University of Pretoria and director of the Centre for the study of Governance Innovation (GovInn).
He is the author of 9 books, including the bestselling Gross Domestic Problem: The Politics Behind the World’s Most Powerful Number and How Numbers Rule the World: The Use and Abuse of Statistics in Global Politics.
According to Public Books, Fioramonti’s research shows that “the reliance on GDP derives from a technocratic worldview that glorifies experts, corrodes communal values, and devalues the natural world.” For the LSE Review of Books, his research is a kind of “psychopath’s guide to bullying the world by numbers”, unmasking the pretention that “everything is ‘rational’, ‘independent’ and ‘objective’ and building fortresses of power around these intentional misrepresentations”.

 

Linda Mwangi

Linda Mwangi

Linda Mwangi
Linda Mwangi is currently working as a Certification Programs Coordinator at Equip Africa Institute, the corporate arm of Mount Kenya University (MKU). Equip Africa Institute provides corporate training and houses MKU’s School of Business & Economics Executive MBA (EMBA) program. Linda received her MBA from Prairie View A&M University, Texas and an undergraduate degree in Education at Egerton University, Kenya in 1993. Linda coordinates the EMBA, a non-academic program targeting professionals based on experiential or problem based learning. A certified leadership facilitator, Linda also facilitates the leadership part of the program as part of a larger team.

Liepollo Pheko

Liepollo Pheko

Liepollo Pheko

Liepollo Lebohang Pheko is an activist scholar , researcher and development practitioner. “Feminist activist at large“. Interests in Afrikan political economy, States& nationhood, international trade & global financial governance, feminisation of poverty, regional integration and impacts of globalisation on labour migration. Senior Research Fellow at research and policy advocacy think tank – Trade Collective and has taught International Trade and developed a course on Afrikan Feminism the Thabo Mbeki African Leadership Institute. Work is grounded in a race, class and feminist analysis and Pheko is committed to grounding academic research in community struggles & contexts. Board member of several academic and development organisations including past president of Business Woman’s Association South Africa and the International Network on Migration and Development. Contributed to five books on international trade, gender and politics and social transformation and written over a hundred conference and academic papers. Prolific economic and policy analyst- AlJazeera,BBc, Sky, CCTV, SABC, ENCA, SAFM. Columnist and essayist on socio-economic and development issues.

Active in various local and global networks, forms of entrepreneurship & innovation especially for women, interested in creating spaces for younger activist scholars to reflect. Spare time is spent immersed in poetry, jazz and the pursuit of stillness.

Globalisation and Labour, International Trade, financial governance, States and Nationhood, regionalism, International relations and governance, feminisation of poverty.

“Progress is about people, not profit''

Justine Braby

Justine Braby

Justine lives in Namibia and studied education, law and zoology. When she graduated with her PhD, she started her career working on sustainability in Africa, and worked for many years within the nexus of development, poverty reduction and conservation, all over the world. As she wandered along this path, she realised that the value system of humanity has been shaped by economic growth, without questioning the narrative of this. We had forgotten that economic growth is supposed to serve people, not the other way around. Since then she has been working on how we, as Africans, can develop Africa with a focus on wellbeing, happiness and health.

Sustainability, Social Wellbeing/Community Wellbeing, Ecology and Biodiversity, Resilience (related to Climate Change), Communication, Education and Public Participation

“Advocacy and Youth Inclusion is now a necessity to ensure a viable economic transform in Africa while protecting ecological and natural resources.”

Joshua Amponsem

Joshua Amponsem

Joshua Amponsem, is an environmental activist and climate advocate with a Bachelor degree in Environmental Science. He focuses on youth mobilization (via volunteerism and social media) for environmental change through education and advocacy.
Joshua sees advocacy as an important medium in engineering change in Africa. While an undergraduate, he founded Green Africa Youth Organization – a non-profit organization which serves as an advocacy anchor in environmental sustainability.

Recently, Joshua was selected as Samsung Engineering’s environmental ambassador to Africa. He also serves as the Research and Outreach Coordinator for Ghana Youth
Climate Coalition, and the Youth Vice President of UNEP’s EBAFOSA in Ghana.

Climate Change; Environmental Advocacy, Sanitation, and Youth Leadership.

Josephine Musango

Josephine Musango

Josephine Musango
Dr Josephine Musango holds a Bachelor degree in Agribusiness Management; a Masters degree in Agricultural Economics; and a Transdisciplinary Doctoral degree in Sustainable Development. She is currently appointed as a Senior Lecturer with the School of Public Leadership (SPL).
She is Deputy-Coordinator of the MPhil Programme in Sustainable Development and is also responsible for the Renewable Energy Stream of the Postgraduate Diploma in Sustainable Development – in collaboration with the Centre for Renewable and Sustainable Energy Studies (CRSES).
She is NRF-rated researcher and her on–going research relates to the application of system dynamics modelling in managing change in resource management and policy related challenges – especially in the energy sector. She is also one of the Founding Members of South Africa System Dynamics Chapter and currently serving as Organising Secretary of the Chapter

Resource Economics, System Dynamics, Technology Assessment, Urban Metabolism, African Cities

I view myself as an activist able to do research

Jeff Rudin

Jeff Rudin

I left South Africa in 1968, and returned home from Britain in 1996.

Since my return, I have been a parliamentary researcher for the ANC for five years, followed by a nine year period with the South African Municipal Workers’ Union (SAMWU), where I was the National Research Officer. I am current based at the Alternative Information and Development Centre (AIDC) in Cape Town, where I am a research associate, with a focus on climate change and political economy.

I have a PhD from Warwick University in Britain.

Climate change, inequality, political economy, identity (colour/class), Arsenal football team

The world will step aside for a woman who knows where she is going. Teaching and empowering the strong women we are and we those we will raise is fundamental in discovering and ''preserving what beauty the Africa holds. Each One, Teach One, Plant one.”

Hope Kasedde

Hope Kasedde

Hope Kasedde holds a Bachelor’s degree in Human Resource Management, a founding partner and Executive Director of Kampala Open Spaces Initiative. She is also a research intern at ACODE- Uganda’s number one public policy think tank. Hope is interested environmental protection, women empowerment, girl child education, and Human Rights law and children affairs. She is an enthusiastic lover of nature and often finds solace in solitude, alone with nature. She has been a change champion promoting the Green Agenda at her places of work and became the intern of the year at the country’s National Social Security Fund before she was elected Change Champion in the Environment, Health and Safety department .She continued to grow her career in the fields of HR and Public policy research and environmental protection. As an aspiring environmental protection baron, Hope seeks to engage business and political leaders to create opportunities for women and disadvantaged communities to have sustainable economic development in Uganda and Africa as a whole.

Environmental and land rights, Employee relations (addressing gender inequalities), Empirical and normative theories of gender construction, Gender economics, Project management

''Governance for pro-poor urban development''

Franklin Obeng

Franklin Obeng

Franklin works on the broad themes of political economy of development, cities, and natural resources. He is currently a Senior Lecturer in Property Economics at the School of Built Environment, University of Technology, Sydney in Australia where he teaches urban economics and property and political economy. Previously, he contributed to teaching the political economy of development unit at The University of Sydney. International recognition of his work includes being chosen as a Dan David Prize Scholar for ‘The March Towards Democracy’ and a World Social Science Fellow for ‘Sustainable Urbanisation’.

Oil, Land, Urban and Regional Development, Social and Economic Development, Political economy

Fidelis Allen

Fidelis Allen

Fidelis Allen

Fidelis Allen, who is Associate Professor of political science, currently directs the Centre for Conflict and Gender Studies, at University of Port Harcourt, Choba, Nigeria. In 2012, he was postdoctoral fellow at the Centre of for Civil Society at the University of KwaZulu-Natal. He graduated from the same university in 2010 with a PhD. His articles have appeared in peer-reviewed local and international journals, including the World Political Journal. His article on Social Movement appeared in the Encyclopaedia of Political Science, published by the America Political Science Association. In the same vein, he has numerous chapters in published books locally and internationally. Allen has consulted for several non-governmental organisations abroad and at home, and participated in numerous research projects as lead consultant.

Social movement politics; environmental policy; natural resource conflict

“We are in an era of a major social transformation since the industrial revolution and Africa has the greatest leapfrogging potential in this transformation”

Desta Mebratu

Desta Mebratu

Desta Mebratu is an Ethiopian national currently working for the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) as Deputy Regional Director for Africa. A chemical engineer by background, he has a PhD of engineering in Industrial Environmental Economics from Lund University, Sweden and an MBA in International Business from American University of London. Dr. Mebratu has more than 26 years of experience working for industries, government agencies, universities and international organizations. He joined UNEP in August 2003 and served as Regional Industry Officer for Africa (2003-2008) and as Head of the Business and Industry Unit of UNEP (2008-11). He has published more than 40 articles in peer-reviewed journals, books and conference reports.

Resource efficient and cleaner production, environmental management systems, sustainable energy systems, Green Economy

Derick de Jongh

Derick de Jongh

Derick de Jongh

Professor Derick de Jongh is the Director of The Albert Luthuli Centre for Responsible Leadership (ALCRL) at the University of Pretoria. He holds a Doctorate in Commerce (Corporate Social Performance) from the same institution. He founded the Centre for Corporate Citizenship (CCC) at the University of South Africa (UNISA) in 2001. The UNISA CCC has since grown to become a world-leading Institute focusing on corporate citizenship research and teaching. His expansive academic career includes numerous presentations at international symposia on the topic of responsible leadership and corporate responsibility. He is a Visiting Professor at institutions such as the Rowe School of Business, Dalhousie University, Canada and at the Asia Pacific Centre for Sustainable Enterprise, Griffith University, Australia where he serves as Adjunct P

rofessor. Derick serves on the editorial boards of numerous journals. He served on the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) technical writing team. He is a member of the Johannesburg Stock Exchange Social Responsible Investment Index (JSE SRI) advisory committee and a member of the Integrated Reporting Committee working group of SA. He was also a member of the King Commission, sustainability sub-committee in writing King III. Derick is founding member of the Globally Responsible Leadership Initiative (GRLI) as well as a founding member of the 50+20 “Management Education for the World” initiative. Derick is member of the World Business School Council for Sustainable Business – a UN PRME, GRLI initiative.

Corporate Citizenship, Responsible leadership, Integrated Reporting, Purpose of Business, Wicket Problems, Sustainable Development

“The strongest ecological justice and radical well-being alternatives are emerging from the Global South, in particular the convergence between peasant, indigenous and ecofeminist values that highlight metabolic care and eco-sufficiency as core principles for building new relationships beyond GDP driven growth and development.”

Christelle Terreblanche

Christelle Terreblanche

Christelle Terreblanche is a veteran political journalist and environmental activist. As a current post-graduate student in Development Studies at the University of KwaZulu-Natal’s Centre for Civil Society, her academic focus is on ecological justice alternatives for the Global South. She works as researcher-educator at the International Labour Research and Information Group (ILRIG), at present concentrating on financialisation of nature and both small farmer and farmworker concerns, while co-editing the journal Workers World News. Previous experience includes work as national coordinator of the One Million Climate Jobs Campaign. As political correspondent since the 1980s, she has written about a wide range of political and policy debates in southern Africa.

 

 

''Transformation starts with the individual''

Chris Nshimbi

Chris Nshimbi

Chris Nshimbi is DST-NRF Research Fellow and Deputy Director of the Center for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn), Department of Political Sciences at the University of Pretoria. He researches regional and sub-regional integration, informal cross-border trade, grassroots non-state actor networks, and social cohesion. He also teaches Regional Integration and Political Dynamics in the University of Pretoria’s Department of Political Sciences. Chris has participated and sits in on regional and international technical working groups on labour and migration.

 

Bruno Losch

Bruno Losch

Bruno Losch

Bruno Losch is currently co-director of the Center for the Study of Governance Innovation (GovInn), based at the University of Western Cape, South Africa, and lead political economist at Cirad (Centre de Coopération Internationale en Recherche Agronomique pour le Développement – France – ArtDev research unit). Over the last three years, he has been working with NEPAD (Rural Futures Program), OECD, UNDP, and AfDB (Africa Economic Outlook 2015), ILO (employment in Africa), and he was involved in research activities related to the UN International Year of Family Farming (IYFF 2014). He joined the World Bank between 2005-2011 where he led the RuralStruc Program on structural transformation and rural change—a joint initiative of the World Bank, IFAD, and the French government. He holds a Master’s in political science and in geography and a PhD in economics.

Rural studies, family agriculture, public policies, and the political economy of development

 

 

Contact : weafricanetwork@gmail.com